In The News: May 2015

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nuts

• Eating a modest amount of nuts lowers the risk for metabolic syndrome later in life, according to a study presented at the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in San Diego. Unfortunately, 75% of teens do not eat nuts.

• Lack of a consistent sleep routine increases hunger in teens, which contributes to weight gain, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s meeting in Dallas.

• Diets rich in plants and low in animal products lower the risk for dying from heart disease or stroke, according to a study reported at the American Heart Association’s meeting in Baltimore.

• Adopting a Mediterranean-style diet lowers a person’s risk for heart disease, according to a study reported at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting in San Diego.

• Including a bit of cocoa-rich dark chocolate might improve energy level, raise exercise stamina, and improve heart health in sedentary seniors, according to a study reported at the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting in San Diego.

• High-dose supplementation with omega-3 fats (4 grams/day) protects against further damage in heart attack patients, according to a study reported at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in San Diego.

• Processed foods account for more than 60% of the calories in typical American diets, according to a study reported at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology’s annual meeting in Boston.

• Drinking several cups of coffee every day could lower a person’s risk of developing multiple sclerosis, according to a study reported at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

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